Education

Conceptual Framework

The mission of the School of Education is to prepare highly effective educators, school counselors, and school leaders who believe in full inclusion, who value diversity, who are reflective, and who are knowledgeable about best practices. Therefore, we ask Sage educators, counselors, and leaders to consider two essential questions throughout their studies and field experiences: Who am I in the lives of those with whom I work? Who am I in the life of my educational community? We expect all Sage candidates to demonstrate leadership and create optimal educational outcomes for all learners.

The motto of Russell Sage College, “To Be, To Know, To Do,” informs the educational purpose of Russell Sage College, where the common effort is to translate learning into action and application, within a framework that recognizes the obligation of educated persons to lead and serve their communities. This motto is extended to form the basis for our programs.

Conceptual Framework: An underlying structure in a professional education unit that gives conceptual meanings through an articulated rationale to the unit’s operation, and provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, faculty scholarship and service, and unit accountability.
 

T-BIRDS — The key concepts of the conceptual framework:

  • Technology: a vehicle for learners to acquire information, practice skills, use higher order thinking skills, and participate in collaborative projects.
  • Best Practices: the pedagogical knowledge, skills and practices that have been shown through research and evaluation to be effective and/or efficient and that candidates use to teach all learners.
  • Inclusion and Diversity: the ability to collaborate and team with other professionals in developing and implementing strategies to accommodate diverse learners; and the ability to develop solutions that will enhance the learning experiences of all children; and the ability of candidates to be aware of and sensitive to diversity issues and to use culturally and socially responsive pedagogy.
  • Reflection: the ability to reflect and assess one’s own effectiveness, and to systematically make adjustments to improve and strengthen areas needing attention.
  • Dispositions: the demonstration of respect for learner differences, commitment to own personal growth, and engagement in short and long-term planning.
  • Service Learning: the strategies that integrate meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich children’s learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

These elements are interrelated and integrated to prepare teacher candidates to assume roles as reflective facilitators of learning, combining knowledge and skills to exemplify those qualities and dispositions that characterize effective teachers.

National Accreditation

The School of Education received National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accreditation in October 2001. Why does NCATE matter? (1) From a student’s perspective, NCATE accreditation means that you will graduate from a program in Education that meets the highest standards in the field. You should make sure to note NCATE accreditation on your resume and be prepared to talk about the significance of this designation. (2) Few colleges and universities can claim this recognition. In New York State we are one of a small number of institutions accredited by NCATE. Across the nation, only 200 private colleges can claim NCATE accreditation. It is prestigious and difficult to achieve. (3) If you are applying for certification in other states, graduating from our NCATE programs will facilitate your receiving licensure in another state. (4) NCATE has helped us to articulate what qualities a Sage educator/counselor possesses. Our tenets – belief in full inclusion, valuing diversity, knowledge about best practices and reflection – will hold you in good stead as teachers/counselors and help you, we believe, articulate and distinguish your strengths in these broad areas. (5) Many of the portfolio assessments and documentation of pupils’ learning are similar to tasks required for National Board Certification; we believe that NCATE has helped us to prepare better graduates who are able to help their students reach high standards. As you go forth in your career, we hope that you will find the kinds of experiences you received at Sage helpful as you seek to improve your professionalism.

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

EDU 201 : Education and Society

This is a survey course for those having an interest in education as a field of study. Its primary aim is to familiarize students with the function of educational institutions in current society. The major social forces and values, psychological theories, knowledge structures, and technologies influencing curricular and instructional choices will be examined. Candidates enrolled in EDU-201 must complete 25 hours of fieldwork.

Credits

3

EDU 206 : Educational Psychology

This course includes a survey of the facts and principles of educational psychology and the results of psychological research as they relate to the major activities and problems of the teacher. Also considered are the general nature of growth and the principles of learning, the nature of reasoning, the realm of values, and the relation of mental health to education. Students enrolled in EDU-206 must complete 25 hours of fieldwork.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU-201 or PSY-101

EDU 252 : Learning, Language and Literacy

Theoretical frameworks of the reading/writing processes and resources used by proficient, less proficient, and beginning readers/writers will be examined. To develop an understanding of the language basis, the relationships between receptive (i.e., listening, writing) and expressive (i.e., speaking, reading) skills will be explored. Participants will learn to develop plans, including goals and objectives, related to the theoretical frameworks in the areas of word recognition/analysis, vocabulary, and comprehension within the context of a directed reading-thinking-writing approach.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU 306 : Inclusive Teaching Strategies

This course focuses on planning for multilevel, structured, exciting learning experiences for students with diverse characteristics. Content includes knowledge concerning learning styles, challenges to learning for all students including those with autism, working with parents and educational personnel, use of learning theories and models of teaching, and developing critical thinking in students. Candidates enrolled in EDU 306 need to complete 15 hours of fieldwork in Special Education.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

EDU-201 , EDU-206

EDU 314 : Social Studies Methods

Using the New York State Learning Standards as a guide, the function and organization of social studies in the elementary school will be addressed. Candidates will be guided in selection of content, use of materials and application of specific teaching methods and unit development.

Credits

2

Prerequisites

EDU 206/PSY 206, EDU 306, , EDU 309

Corequisites

EDU-307

EDU 323 : Teaching Math, Science & Technology

This course examines contemporary methods of teaching elementary math, science and technology which meet the National and New York State Teaching Standards. There will be an emphasis on providing clinically rich experiences for candidates in the teacher education programs which shall include research based pedagogical practices and new approaches to teaching math, science and technology. This course is taught in an area school. Embedded in this course is 30 hours of fieldwork.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

EDU 201, EDU 206, EDU 314, EDU 337, , EDU 352

EDU 325 : Teaching & Learning in Middle School

This course explores the nature of teaching and learning in the middle school. Curriculum and pedagogical decisions are based on the needs of the young adolescent in contemporary society. Interdisciplinary instruction and responsive teaching that actively engage middle school learners in the school community are covered.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU-201, EDU-206

EDU 337 : Classroom Management

This course is designed to provide candidates with a variety of techniques for organizing instruction and managing individual learners and groups. Other topics include classroom organization, administration, evaluation and scheduling.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU 309 , EDU 306

Corequisites

EDU 307

EDU 348 : Topics in Education

TBD. The department occasionally offers special topics courses covering areas and topics not otherwise included in the curriculum.

Credits

1

EDU 352 : Advanced Learning, Language & Literacy

This course is designed to extend candidates? knowledge and skills for teaching reading, writing and the language arts based on the NYSED English Language Arts Learning Standards. The course addresses ways to teach language arts with diverse learners of multicultural backgrounds and learning needs. The course will examine reflective practices, responsive teaching and effective assessment strategies. Also included in the course content are the ways in which teachers can address individual needs of students while creating a community of learners. Candidates enrolled in EDU 352 must concurrently enroll in EDU 314 and EDU 337. This course is taught in an area school. Embedded in this course is 30 hours of fieldwork.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU 401 : Childhood Student Teaching (Grades 1-3)

Student teaching consists of supervised practice teaching in grades 1, 2 and/or 3 with coordinated academic responsibilities. A weekly seminar is required. A $250 fee is required for each placement.

Credits

6

Prerequisites

EDU 306, EDU 314, EDU 323, EDU 337, & EDU 352

EDU 405 : Middle Childhood Student Teaching

Student teaching consists of supervised practice teaching in grades 5 and/or 6 with coordinated academic responsibilities.  A weekly seminar is required.  A $250 fee is required for each placement.

Credits

6

Prerequisites

EDU 307, EDU 312, EDU 313, EDU 314, EDU 315, EDU 319, and EDU 337

EDU 406 : Middle School Student Teaching

Student teaching consists of supervised practice teaching in grades 7 and or 8 with coordinated academic responsibilities.

Credits

6

Prerequisites

EDU-307, EDU-312, EDU-313, EDU-314, EDU-315, EDU-319, EDU-337

EDU 420 : Foundations of Literacy

This course addresses approaches to literacy which reflect best practice and research about learning. The key focus is for all students to become literate, across cultures and capabilities. Basic reading and developmental linguistic theories, models of reading instruction and teaching methods are studied. Participants prepare and teach lessons covering various aspects of literacy. Candidates enrolled in EDU-420 must concurrently enroll in EDU-420F (fieldwork).

Corequisites

EDU-420F

EDU 420F : Foundations of Literacy Fieldwork

Candidates in EDU-420 are required to complete 25 hours of fieldwork associated with the course. The 25 hours of fieldwork are a component of the NYSED requirement that all candidates seeking certification complete 100 hours of fieldwork before student teaching or internship. These hours must be completed in a classroom serving students in the grades for which the candidate is seeking a certificate and must be completed under the supervision of a certified teacher. Candidates who have previously completed fieldwork meeting this requirement should register for EDU-420F and provide documentation of their experience to the EDU fieldwork coordinator.

Corequisites

EDU-420

EDU 474 : Reading & Writing in the Content Areas

Methods and materials for delivering content area instruction through reading and writing are examined. Candidates will design instruction that develops literacy skills and broadens and enriches student learning of academic subjects. In addition, effective teaching strategies for helping struggling and disabled students in inclusive classrooms are covered in detail.

Credits

3