Psychology

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

PSY 101 : Introduction to Psychology

This course introduces the scientific study of behavior and cognitive processes. The topics include the biological and social bases of behavior, motivation, emotion, learning, cognition, perception, personality, and psychotherapy. Students are introduced to the origins of psychology and the bases of psychological reasoning. Students are expected to become familiar with the basic principles in the major areas of the field as well as psychological methods of investigation. PSY 101 is a prerequisite for all psychology courses except PSY 207.

 

Credits

3

PSY 202 : Human Development

This course introduces the developmental perspective in psychology and presents the historical emergence of this perspective. The course surveys individual development from conception through old age, studying physical, perceptual, cognitive, and emotional processes. An emphasis is placed on the interaction among individuals of different ages and the influence of both the immediate and wider social contexts on development. Due to the overlap in course content, students may not receive credit for PSY 202, and PSY 203, PSY 204, or PSY 208.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 206 : Educational Psychology

This course includes a survey of the facts and principles of educational psychology and the results of psychological research as they relate to the major activities and problems of the teacher. Also considered is the general nature of growth and the principles of learning, the nature of reasoning, the realm of values, and the relation of mental health to education. A 25-hour fieldwork practicum placement is required. Students who have completed EDU 206 may not take PSY 206 for credit.

Credits

3

PSY 207 : Statistics with Computer Applications

This course focuses on the study of the statistical techniques critical to quantitative research in the social sciences. Topics include measures of central tendency, variability, correlation, regression, one, two and multi-group hypothesis testing, contingency tables, power analysis, and selected nonparametric methods. Students will be expected to analyze selected problems using major statistical packages such as SPSS. Students who take this course cannot receive credit for MAT 220 or ECO 215.

Credits

4

PSY 208 : Developmental Science

Developmental Science: Infancy, Childhood, Adolescence, & Adulthood will present psychological development across the human lifespan building on biological and social foundations of development with attention to diverse pathways shaped by socio-cultural experience. Students will study the biological bases of prenatal development, puberty, and aging. The course will include infancy, childhood, adolescence, aging and all the phases of adulthood. The course will feature laboratory and fieldwork experience so that students can gain practice in those methods of developmental science that will support their future work, whether it be research in developmental psychology or interdisciplinary research and practice in education, the health and therapeutic sciences and related disciplines. This course is not open to students who have taken another developmental psychology course (i.e. PSY 202, 203, or 204).

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 211 : Introduction to Gender & Sexuality

This course is an introduction to the study of sex, gender and sexuality. We will use both a psychological and sociological lens to examine differences between sex, gender and sexuality. We will explore how gender and sexuality exist today, how they have changed over time and place, and their centrality in how we experience the world around us. We will focus on the social, processes, structures and institutions that influence and are influenced by gender across cultures. That is, we will examine how gender and beliefs about gender affect: parenting and home life; educational experiences and achievements; friendships and romantic relationships; experiences in the workplace, military and sports; media; and political and economic systems. To this end, we will critically examine the interconnections between gender, sexuality, power and inequality.

Credits

3

PSY 215 : Biopsychology

[March 2022: new course number is PSY 316]. This course focuses on an investigation of the physiological, comparative, ecological, and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Topics include basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, behavioral genetics, perception and awareness, sensorimotor integration, motivational, circadian and reward systems, emotion and stress, and the biopsychology of psychiatric disorders. Emphasis is placed on evaluating research and students will learn to ask and answer questions regarding human behavior in the context of all life. Students who have completed BIO 215 or PSY 316 (new course number) cannot take PSY 215 for credit.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 222 : Women and Crime

This course will provide a broad overview of female offending, covering offender characteristics, crimes, and histories leading to criminal behavior. Theories of victimization and female offending, and feminist criminology will be introduced. The physical, psychological, legal, and social implications of women's criminal justice system involvement and incarceration will be explored. This class will consist of lectures, in-class discussion/activities, and guest speakers and videos, when appropriate.

Credits

3

PSY 233 : Research Methods & Design

This course provides a study of research methods used to obtain information about human behavior and cognition. Laboratory experience includes the development of skills in designing, performing and reporting of original research projects. (Formerly known as Experimental Psychology)

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PSY 101 & PSY 207

PSY 242 : Problems of Alcohol & Drug Dep Person

This course examines the various personality and environmental variables conducive to dependency. The effects of alcohol and/or drugs on the personality and interpersonal relations are considered. Withdrawal from alcohol and drugs is examined along with the problems of living without alcohol and drugs. The available screening and diagnostic tests employed to detect and discern dependency are surveyed.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 248 : Special Topics

The department occasionally offers special courses in psychology dealing with areas and topics not otherwise included in the curriculum.
 

Credits

1

PSY 275 : Proseminar: Personal Pathways

This course helps students prepare for careers in psychology as a profession, the choice of and preparation for specific careers, the integration of the academic content of the psychology major with a variety of professional practices, and issues in professional development. Diversity issues including gender and ethnicity will be addressed.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

PSY 101; PSY majors or minors only

PSY 301 : Social Psychology

This course provides a study of human interaction in society and its psychological basis. Some of the major topics covered include aggression, altruism, attitudes, attraction, conformity, group dynamics, perception of self and others, prejudice, social roles, and social power. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101 or SOC 101

PSY 304 : Counseling: Theory and Practice

This course covers the major theories and techniques of counseling. The role of counselor, the needs and problems of the client and the assessment of the counseling situation will be investigated. Multicultural counseling approaches will be included.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 305 : Psychology of Persuasion & Influence

This course is an investigation of persuasion tactics and influence techniques. Topics include consistency and commitment, communicator characteristics, credibility, conformity, compliance gaining, deception and the ethics of persuasion. Students will be required to actively participate in the learning process.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 308 : Abnormal Psychology

This is a study of psychopathology including stress and anxiety disorders, psychoses, and personality disorders, and an evaluation of methods of treating such forms of psychological disorders.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 202 or 203 or 204 or PSY 208

PSY 313 : Learning

A survey is provided in this course of the major theories of learning. Particular consideration will be given to human verbal learning, thinking, cognitive processing, behavior modification, and the technology of learning.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101 or EDU 206 or PSY 206

PSY 316 : Biopsychology

This course focuses on an investigation of the physiological, comparative, ecological, and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Topics include basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, behavioral genetics, perception and awareness, sensorimotor integration, motivational, circadian and reward systems, emotion and stress, and the biopsychology of psychiatric disorders. Emphasis is placed on evaluating research and students will learn to ask and answer questions regarding human behavior in the context of all life. Students who have completed PSY 215 or BIO 215 cannot take PSY 316 for credit.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 317 : Motivation

In this course an investigation of the biological, psychological, and social components of motivation and emotion in both classical and contemporary theories is undertaken. An attempt is made to understand why behavior occurs at all and why one behavior is selected over another.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 319 : Group Dynamics

This course applies the content, structure, and processes of communication and interaction, as well as techniques of leadership, to various types of groups. The course will emphasize theoretical and practical understanding derived from group participation.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 320 : Community Psychology

Community psychology examines the impact of socio-cultural, economic, political, and environmental forces on individuals and communities, and draws upon social change efforts to improve individual and community quality of life, empower community members, and promote social justice. This course will provide you with an introduction to community psychology, with specific emphasis on the history of the field; the guiding theories, principles, and values inherent in the field; and community-based research and intervention. You will learn how to apply the theories, principles, and values to understand and address social phenomena.

Credits

3

PSY 324 : Group Counseling

An examination of major theories of counseling as applied to group counseling is undertaken in this course. A special emphasis is given to an examination of group process and the stages of group development from formation to termination and follow-up. Some basic issues in group membership and leadership and an overview of professional and ethical issues will be presented.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 326 : Health Psychology

Issues of health will be studied from a systems approach with a focus on the shift away from the biomedical model toward the more encompassing biopsychosocial model. Because today's leading causes of death occur partly as the result of individual behaviors or failures to engage in some behavior(s), a major focus in the course will be the cognitive variables intervening between health/illness and behavior. Topics such as stress and coping, immunity, adhering to medical advice, pain, and acute and chronic illness will be covered. This course is relevant to those in health profession programs, psychology, and to others interested in health and this new and growing field.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 329 : Evolutionary Psychology

The course will synthesize the modern principles of psychology with evolutionary theory in exploring human behavior through time and across cultures. The course will explore theory and research on human behavior from an evolutionary perspective, including the evolution of morality, culture and consciousness. Students will learn the basic principles underlying evolution, from Darwin to the modern genetic synthesis, and will explore how these principles provide understanding of the complexities and perplexities underlying human behavior. We will investigate how we solve adaptive problems relating to our survival, group living, mating, and parenting. Further, we will investigate the implications of evolutionary principles for developing a theory of mind, for exploring the cognitive origins of art, religion and science; and for understanding the nature of the self.
 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101 or BIO 102

PSY 339 : Psychology and Law

This course will examine the applications of psychological methods, findings, and theories to the law. The many relationships between the two fields: psychology in the law, psychology and the law and psychology of the law, will be addressed. A variety of topics will be covered including psychology of law enforcement, the courts, jury selection and decision making, family law, and the rights of special groups.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101 , LAW 101

PSY 340 : Domestic Violence

This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine the complexities of power, conflict, and violence in families. A main goal of the course is to improve students' analytic ability in consuming scholarly and popular knowledge about power and violence within the context of family relationships, including intimate partner and parent-child relationships. To achieve this goal, students critically evaluate how violence and abuse in families has been conceptualized over time and how researchers, service providers, policy makers, the criminal justice system, and the general public have responded to this social problem.

Credits

3

PSY 348 : Selected Topics in Psychology

The department occasionally offers special courses in psychology exploring areas and topics not otherwise included in the curriculum.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 365 : Close Relationships

This course will introduce students to a wide range of social science research within the field of Close Relationships. Topics to be covered will address questions such as: What is love? What influences attraction? How does trust develop? How does commitment affect perceptions and judgments? What role does communication play in successful relationships? What makes relationships work? What leads to conflict and how can it be resolved? The influence of personal experience, beliefs, expectations, and values as well as partner interdependence will be examined as possible explanations. Theoretical frameworks and research methodologies that have guided findings in these areas will be emphasized throughout the semester. Completion of PSY 333 recommended.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101

PSY 403 : Seminar

Training is provided in the techniques of research through a detailed study of a specific psychological topic. A major paper is required of each student demonstrating the ability to collect, evaluate and synthesize psychological material.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 275, PSY 233, and 87+ completed credits

PSY 406 : Personality Theory

Students will examine theories and research concerning the nature and development of the human personality and factors producing integration or disorientation. Applications of personality theory and personality assessment will be included in the course.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101 , either PSY 202, PSY 203 or PSY 204

PSY 407 : Internship in Psychology

This fieldwork experience involves working under site supervision in a mental health facility, a human services agency, or in any setting where psychology principles can be applied. The course instructor must give prior approval for any fieldwork experience. Students will meet biweekly to discuss their experiences. Students complete 45 hours in the field for each academic credit (45 internship hours/1 credit hour). 3 credits but may be taken for fewer or more credits with department approval.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

For PSY majors who have accrued at least 24 credits in PSY

PSY 409 : History and Systems of Psychology

This is a study of the historical background of the field of psychology with emphasis on how current systems have evolved from earlier schools of thought. The impact of early psychological schools on current trends in psychology is discussed.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101, 54+ completed credits

PSY 410 : Honors Research

In this course a student prepares a research proposal on some topic of interest in the field of psychology. The proposal includes a statement of the research question, a review of relevant literature, and the method of collecting data.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 233, 87+ completed credits

PSY 411 : Honors Project

Students from PSY 410 may elect this course to complete the research project. This entails collecting the data, data analysis, and writing up the results and discussion. Program Honors are awarded upon successful completion of the project, including an oral presentation. This course substitutes for PSY 403.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 410

PSY 440 : Cognition

Cognition, the study of mental processes, is a central topic in psychology. In this course an information processing approach to cognition will be presented, which includes the acquisition of knowledge, the maintenance of knowledge across time in memory, and the use (accessing) of knowledge to guide behavior. Hot cognition will be contrasted with cold cognition, and methods of studying cognition will be demonstrated.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 101