Biology

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

BIO 101 : General Biology I

This lecture course covers topics in the basic biological principles of life, such as cell structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis, DNA and gene expression, and Mendelian genetics. BIO 101L laboratory course accompanies BIO-101 and allows for the practical application of biological techniques to scientific inquiry in molecular and cellular biology. Credit cannot be earned for both BIO 101 and BIO 104. 

Credits

3

Corequisites

BIO-101L

BIO 101L : General Biology I - Lab

This laboratory course accompanies BIO 101 lecture and allows for the practical application of biological techniques to scientific inquiry in molecular and cellular biology.

Credits

1

Corequisites

BIO 101 (lecture)

BIO 102 : General Biology II

This lecture course covers topics in the basic biological principles of life, such as evolution, population genetics, and phylogenetics; the diversity of life from prokaryotes and protists to fungi, animals, and plants; and ecology. Credit cannot be earned for both BIO 102 and BIO 105.

Credits

3

Corequisites

BIO 102L

BIO 102L : General Biology II Lab

This laboratory course accompanies BIO 102 lecture and allows for the practical application of biological techniques to scientific inquiry in organismal biology.

Credits

1

Corequisites

BIO 102 (lecture)

BIO 108 : Zoology

The animal kingdom is introduced to non-majors. Correlation between structure and function will be investigated among invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Aspects of animal behavior will be discussed. Lecture, lab and fieldwork, and discussion.

Credits

3

BIO 110 : Environmental Issues

We must all live in this world, the very existence of which has been, and currently continues to be, threatened by pollution created by human technology, lifestyles, and over-population. In this course, students will investigate these problems and learn about the possibility, practicality, and morality of various solutions. Credit cannot be earned for both BIO 110 and BIO 130.

Credits

3

BIO 125 : Struct and Funct of Living Forms

This is an introductory level course covering the various forms of life on earth, from microbes to humans, to redwood trees. It is an inquiry-based course in biology intended for the non-major and covers the cellular and molecular basis of life on earth, how cells assemble to form a multi-cellular organism, how the organism relates to the environment, the homeostatic mechanisms that allow for survival, and how these living forms reproduce. Structure is discussed in terms of its relation to function. Students are encouraged to formulate their own questions and are taught how to search for the best answers with the resources available.

Credits

3

BIO 130 : Environmental Biology

Designed for the student with little or no background in biology, the course includes a study of ecology and population dynamic, with an emphasis on the population explosion, resource use and misuse, and pollution issues. Field experiences will be included.

Credits

3

BIO 134 : Human Biology

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology. The normal structure and function of the human body will be considered, together with possible malfunction of cells, tissues and organs. No credit awarded if student has already received credit for BIO 135/BIO 201 and/or BIO 136/BIO 202.

Credits

3

BIO 150 : Writing in Biology

This course is designed to teach students about the definitions of plagiarism and how to write an original body of work in the Biological Sciences. Students will learn how to select an appropriate topic for a term paper, create an outline and rough draft and finalize a paper for submission. A resume and e-portfolio will also be created, critiqued and suggestions will be made for improvements during their educational experience.

Credits

1

BIO 201 : Anatomy and Physiology I

Students will investigate the structure and function of the cell, the skeletal and neuromuscular systems, and the proprioceptive and reticular activating systems relative to sensation, perception, and movement. Laboratory work will include experiments on animals and animal tissue and exercises with human subjects.

Credits

4

Corequisites

BIO 201L

BIO 202 : Anatomy and Physiology II

Studies of the blood, circulatory, digestive, endocrine, respiratory, reproductive, and urinary systems will be included. Laboratory work will include experiments on animals and animal tissue and exercises with human subjects.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 201, BIO 201L

Corequisites

BIO 202L

BIO 206 : Genetics

This is a study of the principles of modern and classical genetics, including molecular biology of genetic material and its functions; mechanisms of recombination in phage, bacteria, and higher organisms; control of gene activity during development; gene frequencies in populations; and selection and evolution. Laboratory studies will include phage, bacteria and Drosophila, and use of biochemical analysis.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-104 , BIO-105

BIO 207 : Fundamentals of Genetics

This course investigates the fundamental principles of genetics including transmission of genetic information, Mendelian heredity and modern genetics. Through readings, discussions and video, students will learn about the fundamental principles of genetics, as well as explore the personal, political, and socio logical implications of this rapidly expanding field.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO 101 is recommended

BIO 208 : Microbiology

This is an introduction to the principles and techniques of microbiology including a brief study of infectious diseases, the host defense mechanisms, sanitation, and the microbiology of water, foods, and soil.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Completion of one BIO or CHM course

Corequisites

BIO 208L

BIO 209 : Fundamentals of Forensics

This course will examine the many areas of forensic science. It is designed to explore the use of biological evidence and, specifically, the importance of DNA in a criminal investigation. Other areas of forensics, such as toxicology, chemical analysis, and ballistics will be discussed and the importance of forensic evidence in the courtroom will also be examined.

Credits

3

BIO 213 : Human Anatomy & Physiology

This course emphasizes the essential physiological principles underlying the function of the human body. The following systems and/or units will be covered: cells and tissues, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, blood, respiratory, digestive, urinary and fluid balance, and reproduction. (Not open to biology majors without special permission.)

Credits

4

Prerequisites

One semester of BIO, CHM or PHY or sophomore status (24+ credits)

BIO 220 : Cell Biology

This course is a study of the cellular basis of life and focuses on the fundamental principles that unify cells. A detailed understanding of cellular function and cell components is undertaken. Cellular control and intracellular signaling is examined, in addition to how some of these processes malfunction and underlie certain diseases. Laboratory experiements emphasize current techniques used to study cellular function.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 101/BIO 102 or BIO 201/BIO 202

Corequisites

BIO 220L

BIO 312 : Evolution

Under discussion will be the processes of evolution as they have occurred in the past and are occurring in the present, and the sources of variability, natural selection, adaptation, extinction, and the origin of species, including human evolution.

Credits

3

BIO 320 : Seminar in Biology

This course focuses on an investigation of current research publications and presentation of oral and written scientific reports. [Course number changed to BIO 450 beginning in Fall 2016]

Credits

3

BIO 326 : Principles of Ecology

This is an introduction to the principles of animal and plant ecology. Major topics includes biome description, communities, succession, ecosystem structure and function, ecosystem energetic, biogeochemical cycles, population dynamics, competition, predation/perdition, and ethe evolution of ecosystems. Field trips are included.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO 101/BIO 101L

BIO 330 : Chemical Biology

This course provides an overview of the structure, function and chemistry of biological macromolecules including proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids.  The interactions and comparative aspects of microbial, plant, and animal forms are stressed.  Specific examples of molecular techniques from current research and applications to medicine are emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisites

CHM-202

BIO 336 : Animal Behavior

Under discussion will be the biology of behavior in lower and higher animals; animal communication, oreintation, navigation, mimicry, courtship, aggression, social behavior, and learning; and, the evolution, ecology, and development of behavior. Readings, laboratory experiments, films, and field trips are included. An independent project will be conducted.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO 101/101L and BIO 102/102L

BIO 348 : Topics in Biology

Special topics of current interest in the biological sciences are examined.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO 104-105

BIO 350 : New Emerging Diseases

This course investigates emerging infectious diseases, EIDs. EIDs are diseases that are new or changing, and are increasing or have the potential to increase in incidence in the future. EIDs include such diseases as West Nile Encephalitis, Mad Cow Disease, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, Cryptosporidiosis, and AIDS. Through readings, discussion and video, students will learn about the etiology of these and other diseases, as well as explore reasons why these diseases are on the rise. The potential use of microbes in biological warfare will be discussed as well.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO 101 & BIO 102

BIO 351 : Immunology

This course investigates the various ways living systems have devsied to subvert infections by viruses, bacteria, and parasites.  The mechnisms of innate and acquired immunity as well as conditions which result in immunodeficiency or the opposite, autoimmunity, will be studied.  The mechanism and genetics of antibody diversity will be discussed.  Mechanisms of cell signaling and cell recognition, the ability to discern self from anti-self, and the tools of immunology will be central to the course.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-101 & BIO-102

BIO 358 : Proseminar: Comm. in Biol. Sci

This course prepares students in communication skills required for employment and graduate training. Students are guided in preparation and delivery of oral and written reports from current biological literature. In addition, students are invited to explore current options in graduate studies and employment in biological laboratories.

Credits

3

BIO 359 : Explorations in Research Methods

This is an interactive lecture and laboratory course promoting research methodology, laboratory skills, critical thinking, data analysis, practice in experimental design, and active involvement in a research process. By the completion of this course, students will have developed a research proposal for their senior independent project and will have explored the research methodologies that project will require.

Credits

3

BIO 405 : Molecular Genetics

This capstone course requires students to draw upon their methodological, analytical and communication skills as well as their substantive learned knowledge. These skills will be demonstrated through laboratory activities and written lab reports, oral presentations, scientifically prepared papers and peer reviewed article critiques. As a subject matter, this course presents an overview of Molecular Genetics topics such as recombinant DNA technology, modes of inheritance and gene expression, disease modeling and genetic approaches to medicine, along with contemporary topics. Students conduct research in laboratory using analytical techniques. Students also enroll in lab section.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 101/101L & BIO 102/102L

BIO 415 : Cell and Molecular Biology

This capstone course requires students to draw upon their methodological, analytical and communication skills as well as their learned knowledge. These skills will be demonstrated through laboratory activities and written lab reports, oral presentations, scientifically prepared papers and critiques of peer reviewed articles. This course investigates the molecular mechanisms of gene regulation, cancer progression, cell signaling and cytoskeletal interactions. Students conduct research in laboratories using analytical procedures that reinforce the protocols discussed in the classroom. Students must enroll in the lab.
 

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 101/101L, BIO 102/102L, CHM 111/111L, and CHM 112/112L

Corequisites

BIO 415L

BIO 450 : Seminar in Biology

Students analyze and critique, through discussion and writing, publications of current research topics. Advising Note: This is a capstone course for students in the Department of Biology and Health Sciences programs.  Formerly offered as BIO 320.

Credits

3

BIO 484 : Neurobiology

This course will focus on the human nervous system but will also discuss animal experiments as they apply to understanding human brain function. The development of the nervous system as well as pertinent neuroanatomy and significant historical events in the field are also covered. The course begins with an overview of the organization of the nervous system, and then focuses on cell and synaptic physiology. Following this chemical and pharmacological aspects of synapses are discussed. The hierarchical organizations of the brain are studied. This is then integrated into how the brain functions as a whole. The functions of each area of the brain are examined and the basis of learning and memory are discussed. The basis of language and emotion are covered. Some of the common brain disorders are also discussed.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO 101 & BIO 102