Criminal Justice

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

CRM 105 : Introduction to Criminal Justice

The introductory course in the criminal justice sequence. Students are introduced to the administration and objectives of law enforcement, the courts, corrections, probation, and parole. (Formerly CRJ/SOC 111)

Credits

4

CRM 111 : Criminal Justice Functions & Processes

The introductory course in the criminal justice sequence. Students are introduced to the administration and objectives of law enforcement, the courts, corrections, probation, and parole. (Also SOC-111). Students cannot get credit for both SOC/CRM-111 and SOC/CRM-105.

Credits

3

CRM 120 : Deviant Behavior

An examination of deviant behavior from various perspectives in sociology. The course focuses upon the social functions of deviant behavior, the processes of social typing and labeling, who becomes deviant, and the connections between deviance and the major forms of social control found in society.

Credits

3

CRM 212 : Juvenile Delinquency

This examination of juvenile delinquency in the United States includes the nature of delinquency, factors associated with delinquency, and the major theoretical perspectives. Characteristic of the juvenile justice system are also explored.

Credits

3

CRM 219 : Law and Legal Process

In this course students will learn about the U.S. legal system, including the civil, criminal, and juvenile systems. Legal professions will also be discussed. What law is and how laws are created are studied. Students conduct court observations. 

Credits

3

CRM 222 : Women and Crime

This course will provide a broad overview of female offending, covering offender characteristics, crimes, and histories leading to criminal behavior. Theories of victimization and female offending, and feminist criminology will be introduced. The physical, psychological, legal, and social implications of women's criminal justice system involvement and incarceration will be explored. This class will consist of lectures, in-class discussion/activities, and guest speakers and videos, when appropriate.

Credits

3

CRM 226 : Penology

An examination of philosophies of punishment in their historical setting, reformation of criminal laws and the origin of prison systems, probation, institutional care, parole, and the nature of correctional institutions.

Credits

3

CRM 227 : Policing

This course examines law enforcement as a social institution in the United States. Particular attention is paid to the history and evolution of the police function; racial, ethnic, and gender dominance in policing; organization and management of police services; police community relations; and other contemporary law enforcement issues. 

Credits

3

CRM 250 : Serial Killers and Other Offenders

For a variety of reasons, people perform unspeakable acts. We will examine those acts and those reasons. Like many topics in criminal justice, this one is complicated. There are many myths surrounding these topics and opinions on law enforcement’s efforts to stop the serial offender. We will look at the types of serial criminal behavior. We will look at the motivation, historical placement and methods of serial offenders. Although serial killers get the most attention, you will find them in the minority of criminals who commit their offenses multiple times. Although you may not be sympathetic to these characters, you will learn to understand them and their crimes.

Credits

3

CRM 266 : Criminal Law

An in-depth look at criminal procedure law focusing on constitutional issues arising from the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. Particular topics include arrest and arraignment, grand jury proceedings, the right to counsel, search and seizure, and trial strategies.

Credits

3

CRM 301 : Drugs and Crime

Drugs and crime is a special topics course that covers the controversial nature of licit and illicit substances and their impact on individuals and society. The course includes a discussion of the history of drugs and drug users, the correlation between drugs, violence, and crime, drugs as a public health issue, the art on drugs, and other drug policy issues.

Credits

3

CRM 305 : Cops and Robbers

What do Al Capone, Serpico, J. Edgar Hoover, Bonnie and Clyde and Sammy the Bull have in common? In this course, tales of legendary cops and ‘robbers’ will be used to examine compelling questions of our time.

Credits

3

CRM 310 : Victims and Their Experiences

This course examines the nature, extent and consequences of criminal victimization. Specific attention is paid to victims of domestic violence, victims of rape and sexual assault, child victims of abuse and neglect, and elderly victims.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

SOC-101 or CRM-111

CRM 311 : Criminology

An in-depth examination of sociological, biological, and psychological theories of adult and juvenile criminal behavior. Also discussed is the incidence of crimes.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CRM 111 or SOC 101

CRM 315 : The Nature of Crime

This is an advanced course on crime, theory of crime, and criminal behavior. Students will empirically explore the measurement of crime, crime distribution, and crime theory. Reading of primary research required.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

SOC-101 or CRM-111

CRM 319 : Women and the Law

The relationship of women to the law is explored from many vantage points, including: how law has been used to limit/expand women's place in society; the differential enforcement of law by sex; and women's role in the legal system. (Also: POL-319, SOC-319, WST-319) 

Credits

3

CRM 325 : Restorative Justice

This course is an introduction to the restorative justice paradigm, which emphasizes the restoration and healing of relationships affected by crime, offender accountability for the harm cause, and the empowerment of victims and communities in responding to crime and justice. The course will compare and contrast a restorative justice model with the dominant retributive/punitive model of justice and explore the roles, experiences, and needs of key stakeholders in both models. Established and emerging practices and programs of restorative justice will be examined.

Credits

3

CRM 329 : Domestic Violence

This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine the complexities of power, conflict, and violence in families. A main goal of the course is to improve students' analytic ability in consuming scholarly and popular knowledge about power and violence within the context of family relationships, including intimate partner and parent-child relationships. To achieve this goal, students critically evaluate how violence and abuse in families has been conceptualized over time and how researchers, service providers, policy makers, the criminal justice system, and the general public have responded to this social problem.

Credits

3

CRM 334 : Prison Reentry

This course is designed to give the student an in-depth understanding of the complex phenomenon of prison inmates returning to the community. Students will examine the elements present in the prison and in the community that both help and hinder successful reintegration.  State and national reentry plans and programs will be discussed.

Credits

3

CRM 335 : Terrorism

This course examines the concept of terrorism, including a historical perspective, contemporary issues and future trends. Specific areas of study include but are not limited to: origins of modern terrorism; motivation of terrorists – religious, ethnic and nationalistic; international and domestic terrorism; left-wing and right wing terrorism; and the cost-benefits of counter-terrorism.

Credits

3

CRM 340 : Violent Crime

This course explores the social construction of violent crime - what it is, what is known about it, and how society responds to it. We will study the offenders and the victims of violent crime - who they are, what happens when violent crime occurs between them, and how they respond to it. Specific types of violence are integrated into this discussion and may include such topics as gun violence, school violence, sexual violence, and hate violence.

Credits

3

CRM 342 : Specialized Courts

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, there was a steady influx of people entering state prisons for drug sales and possession. Contemporary thinking suggested that many of these new inmates were in fact drug addicts, dealing in narcotics and other substances as an element of their untreated substance abuse problem. The idea of a drug court setting that sent people to treatment instead of prison captured the American imagination. Shortly after, a number of other types of courts -- aimed at the problem that resulted in the criminal behavior-- took shape. This is an in-depth examination of those courts, their supporters and critics.

Credits

3

CRM 345 : Cybercrime

This course explores cybercrime - cybercrime definitions and measurement, offenders and victims of cybercrime, and how the criminal justice system responds to cybercrime. Specific types of cybercrime are integrated into this discussion and may include such topics as identity theft, digital child pornography and cyberstalking.

Credits

3

CRM 348 : Special Topics

Contemporary issues in criminal justice are examined. Students may enroll in this course more than once as topics change. 3 credits.

Credits

3

CRM 353 : Evidence

Examination of the means by which alleged matters are established or disproved; foundation for courtroom testimony with emphasis on legalization of proof, exclusionary rules, witness examination, res gestae, dying declarations, confessions, and presumptions.

Credits

3