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  Aug 12, 2018
 
 
    
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General Education & Degree Requirements


  • RSC General Education Requirements • SCA General Education Requirements

Graduation Requirements - Undergraduate

The ultimate responsibility for fulfilling graduation requirements rests with the individual student. Students should regularly review their academic information with their advisors to make certain that requirements for degrees are being met.

  • GPA: 2.000 cumulative grade point average required (minimum). *Note: some major programs require a higher cumulative GPA. See specific program pages for more information.
  • Total Credits Required: 120 total completed credits (minimum) is required for the baccalaureate degree. *Note: some major programs require more than 120 credits. See specific program pages for more information.
  • Thirty of the last 45 credit hours must be completed in residence (Sage/institutional credits).
  • General Education: Students must satisfy all General Education requirements (RSC | SCA)
  • Major Requirements: in order to earn a bachelor’s degree, students must successfully complete a major program.
    • Major grade point average of 2.200 (minimum) is required for all courses required in major, including required support courses. *Note: some major programs require a higher major GPA. See specific program pages for more information.
    • All students must complete at least half of the major coursework at The Sage Colleges.
    • The determination of standards of performance acceptable for continuance in a major is the responsibility of the appropriate academic department and the Dean of the College.
  • Bachelor of Arts degree (BA) must include a minimum of 90 credit hours in the liberal arts and sciences.
  • Bachelor of Science degree (BS) must include a minimum of 60 credit hours in the liberal arts and sciences.
  • Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) must include a minimum of 30 credit hours in the liberal arts and sciences.
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (BFA) must include a minimum of 30 credit hours in the liberal arts and sciences.
  • Bachelor of Professional Studies degree (BPS) must include a minimum of 30 credit hours in the liberal arts and sciences.

General Education at Russell Sage College: 38 credits

Russell Sage’s general education program aims to assist students in developing the following Women of Influence Learning Goals, as delivered through our core requirements (the WORLD program) and our distribution requirements. 

To Be, To Know, To Do: The Women of Influence Learning Goals

1.      The Communicative Arts, including:  Writing, Listening, Observing, Speaking, and Presentation    

Ability to write in different styles and for a variety of audiences; interpersonal communication skills; public speaking skills; effective use of expressive modalities and technologies

2.      Critical Analysis, Integrative Learning, and Research

Ability to evaluate and synthesize information from multiple sources; practice in working across disciplines on problems that require multiple perspectives; understanding of the general practices of scholarly research, and practice in the research techniques of the academic major

3.      Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning    

Practice in scientific inquiry and quantitative reasoning (applying mathematical principles) in a real-world context

4.      Global, National, and Local Citizenship; Ethical Engagement

A deep understanding of democracy; global interdependence and American pluralism; ethical issues and social responsibility

5.      Intercultural Knowledge and Competence    

Deepening awareness of and active involvement with diverse communities in and out of the classroom

6.      Leadership, Teamwork, and Problem-Solving

Flexibility in taking on different roles in different contexts, demonstrating an understanding that educated professionals must move fluidly among those positions

7.      Creative and Imaginative Thinking

Innovative thinking that integrates aesthetic sensibility, intellectual risk-taking; building upon acquired knowledge in new and multiple contexts

The World Program

WORLD stands for Women Owning Responsibility for Learning and Doing, and as the title of our general education program, translates Sage’s founding motto – “to be, to know, to do” – into the educational challenges facing 21st century women. It further indicates our commitment to a global perspective and our respect for the diversity of our community, both narrowly and broadly defined.

Core Courses : 11 Credits

These three courses, which immerse students in reading, writing, critical thinking and analysis, intercultural knowledge and citizenship, teamwork, research, academic reflection and cultural literacy, offer a common educational experience to all Russell Sage students and provide a core around which co-curricular activities will be planned. Thus, students should expect to attend and benefit from many of the campus performances, lectures, and other activities that will be linked to their core course work. 

2016 General Education Breadth Requirement : 27 Credits

The updated RSC General Education Program (that applies to students who enter RSC in Fall 2016 or later) assures a more diverse distribution of required coursework in five major breadth areas.  The program also allows for assessment of targeted student learning outcomes in each area of breadth.  Note that students may be able to satisfy some of the breadth requirements listed below through their required major and/or minor courses.  In addition, transfer students may be able to substitute transfer credits toward the Breadth requirement with approval of the Russell Sage College Dean.  Students and advisors may inquire about this process through the Associate Dean’s office ([email protected]).

  • Quantitative Reasoning (3 cr)  

    • Courses that meet this requirement will have [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Quantitative Reasoning] at the conclusion of the course descriptions in this catalog.

    • Approved courses as of July 13, 2018: CHM 103, CHM 104, CHM 111, CHM 112, ECO 201, MAT 111, MAT 121, MAT 220, PHY 101, PHY 107, PSY 207

    • Upon successful completion of a Quantitative Reasoning course students will be able to:

1. Determine if a written interpretation of quantitative data is supported by the data.
2. Summarize multiple graphical or tabular displays of quantitative data.
3. Solve problems by identifying and executing an appropriate method.

  • Natural & Physical Sciences (6 cr)  

    • Courses that meet this requirement will have [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Natural & Physical Sciences] at the conclusion of the course descriptions in this catalog.

    • Approved courses as of July 13, 2018: BIO 101, BIO 101L, BIO 125, BIO 202, CHM 103, CHM 104, CHM 111, CHM 112, CHM 201, HST 155, HST 248 (Fall 2016 only), PHY 101, PHY 107, SCI 104, SCI 120, SCI 235

    • Upon successful completion of a Natural & Physical Science course students will be able to:

1. Understand terminology: Within a given scientific discipline, there is typically a specific “language” with which the student must become familiar on at least a basic level.
2. Formulate hypotheses based on information: Given a set of facts (in lecture) or observations (in the lab), a student should be able to make a general hypothesis that could be tested.
3. Apply concepts to a given situation: This can be seen as the converse of (2) above. Just as a student should be able to formulate a hypothesis based on information, the student should also be able to apply a hypothesis or theory that has been presented to predict outcomes.

  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 cr)  
    • Courses that meet this requirement will have [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Social & Behavioral Sciences] at the conclusion of the course descriptions in this catalog.

    • Students must complete courses from two distinct disciplines (with two different course prefixes).

    • Approved courses as of July 13, 2018: COM 248 (Spring 2017 only), CRJ 111, CRJ 212, CRJ 219, CRJ 319, ECO 201, HSC 306, HST 115, HST 150, HST 208, HST 221, HST 225, HST 229, HST 230, HST 238, HST 245, HST 248 (Spring 2017 only), HST 335, HST 336, PACE 201, PACE 248 (Fall 2016 only), PHI 248 (Fall 2016 only), PACE 248 (Spring 2018 only), POL 101, POL 115, POL 150, POL 208, POL 218, POL 219, POL 221, POL 225, POL 229, POL 230, POL 245, POL 248 (Fall 2016 only, Spring 2018 only), POL 319, POL 326, POL 335, POL 336, PSY 101, PSY 208, PSY 326, SOC 101, SOC 111, SOC 206, SOC 209, SOC 212, SOC 213, SOC 219, SOC 319, SOC 335, WST 206, WST 209, WST 319, WST 333, WST 335

    • Upon successful completion of a Social & Behavioral Science course students will be able to:

1. Apply research, reading, analysis, interpretation, and writing skills to critical thinking and/or problem solving in the social sciences.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of diverse perspectives, theories and concepts relevant to the discipline.
3. Recognize the role of ethics, public policy, and/or the rule of law in society and its study.

  • Humanities - Fine & Performing Arts (3 cr)  
    • Courses that meet this requirement will have [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Humanities-Fine & Performing Arts] at the conclusion of the course descriptions in this catalog.

    • Approved courses as of July 13, 2018: AFA 101, AFA 106, AFA 202, AFA 206, AFA 248 (Fall 2016 only), AFA 317, DAN 111, DAN 213, DAN 226, DAN 231, DAN 235, DAN 241, DAN 250, DAN 316, DAN 347, DAN 349, DAN 404, ENG 248 (Summer 2018 only), ENG 308, ENG 348 (Fall 2017 only), THR 103, THR 203, THR 205, THR 212, THR 248 (Summer 2018 only), THR 348 (Fall 2017 only), VPA 111

    • Upon successful completion of a Humanities-Fine & Performing Arts course students will be able to:

1. Identify cultural and historical perspectives within the art form.
2. Interpret and apply technical and creative elements within the art form.
3. Communicate a personal response based on a broad understanding of the art form.

  • Humanities - History  (3 cr)  
    • Courses that meet this requirement will have [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Humanities-History] at the conclusion of the course descriptions in this catalog.

    • Approved courses as of July 13, 2018: AFA 206, COM 248 (Spring 2017 only), HIS 331, HST 101, HST 102, HST 105, HST 106, HST 109, HST 110, HST 115, HST 150, HST 155, HST 208, HST 209, HST 218, HST 221, HST 225, HST 229, HST 230, HST 232, HST 233, HST 238, HST 243, HST 245, HST 248 (Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018 only), HST 250, HST 305, HST 320, HST 322, HST 324, HST 325, HST 329, HST 331, HST 335, HST 336, HST 348 (Fall 2016 only), HST 355, PACE 248 (Spring 2018 only), POL 115, POL 150, POL 208, POL 221, POL 225, POL 229, POL 230, POL 245, POL 248 (Spring 2018 only), POL 335, POL 336, SOC 335, WST 232, WST 305, WST 335

    • Upon successful completion of a Humanitites-History course students will be able to:

1. Apply a historical and critical approach to the study of the evolution of human society, and understand this in terms of historical process, historical context, and environment.
2. Identify the role played by social, political, and economic forces in historical processes within societies and between societies.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between historiography in general, and to current historical interpretations in particular.

  • Humanities - Literature & Languages (3 cr)  
    • Courses that meet this requirement will have [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Humanities-Literature & Languages] at the conclusion of the course descriptions in this catalog.

    • Approved courses as of July 13, 2018: ARA 101, CHN 101, CHN 102, ENG 154, ENG 165, ENG 190, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 206, ENG 208, ENG 211, ENG 213, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 233, ENG 248 (Fall 2017, Fall 2018 only), ENG 266, ENG 267, ENG 270 (offered as ENG 248 in Fall 2016), ENG 321, ENG 341, ENG 248 (Spring 2018 only), FRE 101, FRE 102, FRE 201, FRE 202, GER 101, HST 348 (Fall 2016, Spring 2017 only), ITA 101, ITA 102, NSG 267, POR 101, SPA 101, SPA 102, SPA 110, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 248 (Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018 only), SPA 270 (offered as SPA 248 in Fall 2016), SPA 273, SPA 335, SPA 348 (Fall 2016, Spring 2017 only), WST 267

    • Upon successful completion of a Humanities-Literature & Languages course students will be able to:

1. Apply critical and reflective reading and thinking skills.
2. Interpret cultural and historical knowledge in relation to language and literature.
3. Demonstrate communicative skills including critical and creative writing, speaking, and presenting.

  • Humanities - Elective (3 cr)  
    • Courses that meet this requirement will have [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Humanities-Fine & Performing Arts], [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Humanities-History], [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Humanities-Literature & Languages], or [RSC-GenEd-Breadth-2016: Humanities-Elect] at the conclusion of the course descriptions in this catalog.

    • Approved courses as of July 13, 2018: All of the above listed courses in the other Humanities breadt areas will satisfy this requirement, allong with these additional courses- COM 104, HMN 201, HMN 420, HST 230, PACE 248 (Fall 2016 only), PHI 248 (Fall 2016 only), POL 248 (Fall 2016 only), POL 230, VPA 248 (Spring 2018 only)

    • Upon successful completion of a Humanities-Elective course students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of the human experience in historical, cultural or literary contexts.
2. Apply critical thinking and interdisciplinary perspectives to course content.


RSC General Education Requirements for Students who entered prior to Fall 2016

All Russell Sage College students who entered the institution in fall 2011 or later have been required to complete the core requirements WLD 101, WLD 201, and WLD 401 (or their equivalents).  In addition, students who entered RSC between fall 2004 and spring 2016 must satisfy the following distribution requirement (which was replaced by the aforementioned breadth requirement for students entering in fall 2016 or later).

Distribution Requirement

This component of the general education program seeks to ensure that all Russell Sage College students have a broad exposure to the various liberal arts and sciences disciplines. While students are, understandably, committed to their major fields of study, this aspect of general education will help maintain students’ options for the future and will offer them intellectual and personal satisfaction as well.

Humanities/Arts 12 cr. (H/A)

To be taken from courses with the following discipline codes: AFA, ARA, ART, CHN, DAN, FRE, GER, GLO, HST, ITA, MUS, PHI, POR, RUS, SPA, THR. In addition:

  • Any COM courses except 202, 221, 235
  • Any ENG courses except 101, 102, 220, 235
  • HMN 201 Food, Culture and Nutrition only
  • VPA 111 Introduction to Visual and Performing Arts only
  • WST 213, 214, 215, 232, 244, 250, 305, 306, 343, 347, 351 only 

Quantitative Reasoning 3 cr. (QR)

To be taken from the following:

  • PSY 207 Statistics with Computer Applications
  • MAT 109 Contemporary Mathematics
  • MAT 111 Math for Teaching and Learning I
  • MAT 121 Math For Teaching & Learning II
  • or any MAT course numbered 200 or higher 

Social Sciences 6 cr. (SS)

To be taken from the following:

  • CRJ 105, 111, 212, 229, 310, 311, 319, 330, 392 only
  • Any ECO courses
  • HSC 206 only
  • Any PACE courses
  • Any POL courses
  • Any PSY courses (except 206, 331, 359)
  • Any SOC courses (except 202, 273, 331, 339)
  • WST 104, 206, 207, 208, 209, 222, 223, 310, 316, 319, 321, 333, 335, 405 only
  • WST 348 may be a social science distribution course depending upon topics 

Natural Sciences 6 cr. (NS)

To be taken from the following:

  • Any BIO courses except 340
  • Any CHM courses except 340
  • Any PHY courses
  • Any SCI courses 

Cross-Cultural Course 3 Cr. (XC)

These courses may double-count with major or distribution requirements. Students choose one cross-cultural course (XC) in any department from the following list.

  • ARA 101 Intro to Arabic
  • CHN 101 Introduction to Mandarin Chinese
  • CHN 102 Cont. Intro to Mandarin Chinese
  • CRJ 229 The Death Penalty
  • DAN 210 History of Ballet
  • DAN 212 History of 20th Century Dance
  • ECO 310 Comparative Political Economy
  • ECO 313 Economic Development
  • ECO 318 Economies in Transition
  • ENG 213 African-American Literature
  • ENG 215 U.S. Latino/Latina Literature
  • ENG 221 Native American Literature
  • ENG 250 Women’s Literature
  • FRE 201 Intermediate French I
  • FRE 202 Intermediate French II
  • GER 101 Introduction to German
  • GLO 101 Introduction to Globalization
  • HMN 201 Food, Culture and Nutrition
  • HSC 206 Cultural Perspectives of Health, Disability and Wellness
  • HST 101 The Emerging World I
  • HST 102 The Emerging World II
  • HST 103 African History I
  • HST 104 African History II
  • HST 107 Latin American History I
  • HST 108 Latin American History II
  • HST 209 20th Century World
  • HST 218 Russia and East Europe
  • HST 221 The Modern Middle East
  • HST 233 History of Modern China
  • HST 239 Modern Japan
  • HST 240 Slavery in the Americas
  • HST 243 South African History, Politics and Culture
  • HST 245 African/American History & Politics
  • HST 305 Women in Developing Countries
  • HST 306 Women’s Sexuality & Global Change
  • HST 317 20th Century Europe-Global Context
  • HST 320 Native American History & Culture
  • HST 323 Women, Children & War
  • HST 325 Caribbean History, Society & Culture
  • HST 351 Women in the African Experience
  • HST 336 U.S. Foreign Policy
  • ITA 101 Introduction to Italian
  • ITA 102 Cont. Introduction to Italian
  • MGT 340 Leadership and Diversity
  • NTR 225 Puerto Rico: Culture, History, Nutrition
  • PBH 201 Health & Society: Survey of Public HEalth
  • PBH 310 Overview of Global Health
  • PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy:Basic Questions
  • PHI 107 Religions of the World
  • PHI 211 Myth, Religion and Art
  • PHI 241 Philosophy of Multiculturalism
  • POL 107 Latin American History I
  • POL 221 The Modern Middle East
  • POL 233 Modern China
  • POL 238 Russia and East Europe
  • POL 239 Modern Japan
  • POL 245 African/American History & Politics
  • POL 310 Comparative Political Economy
  • POL 323 Women, Children & War
  • POL 336 U.S. Foreign Policy
  • POR 101 Introduction to Portuguese
  • POR 102 Continuing Introduction to Portuguese
  • PSY 208 Developmental Science: Infancy, Childhood, Adolescence, Adulthood
  • RUS 101 Intro to Russian
  • RUS 102 Cont. Intro to Russian
  • SOC 206 Sociology of Families
  • SOC 208 Race and Ethnic Relations
  • SOC 209 Gender and Sexuality
  • SOC 213 Power and Privilege
  • SOC 229 The Death Penalty
  • SPA 110 Intro to Spanish for the Health Professions
  • SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I
  • SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II
  • SPA 210 Intro to Spanish for the Health Professions II
  • SPA 211 Advanced Intermediate Spanish
  • SPA 273 Spanish for the Health Professions
  • SPA 310 Spanish Culture and Conversation
  • SPA 335 Latin American Society in Film
  • WST 206 Sociology of Families
  • WST 207 Cultural Perspectives of Health, Disability & Wellness
  • WST 209 Gender and Sexuality
  • WST 305 Women in Developing Countries
  • WST 306 Women’s Sexuality & Global Change
  • WST 333 Power and Privilege
  • WST 351 Women in the African Experience

Note(s): In addition, certain topic courses (e.g. ENG 248 or HST 348) may be declared as cross-cultural for particular topics. Check with the Advising office or the Registrar’s office relative to specific topics.

Liberal Arts Courses (RSC)

In addition to the required 38 credits of General Education, each degree program requires liberal arts courses as a foundation of learning. The liberal arts requirement “double counts” with general education or major requirements. A Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree must include a minimum of 90 credit hours of the liberal arts. A Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree must include a minimum of 60 credits in the liberal arts. A Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A) or Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree must include a minimum of 30 credits in the liberal arts.

Liberal Arts Courses are those with the following prefixes: AFA, ANT, ARA, ART, CHN, DAN, ECO, ENG, FRE, GER, GLO, HST, HMN, ITA, MAT, MUS, PACE, PBH, PHI, PHY, POL, POR, RUS, SCI, SPA, THR, VPA, WLD. In addition:

  • Any BIO courses except 340
  • Any CAT courses except 207, 307, 407
  • Any CHM courses except 340
  • Any COM courses except 202, 221
  • Any CRJ courses except 352, 353, 356
  • HSC 210, HSC 206, HSC 306, HSC 410 only
  • MGT 332 Conflict Management and Mediation only
  • Any PSY courses except 206, 303, 331, 359
  • Any SOC courses except 202, 273, 331, 339
  • Any WST courses except 235, 312, 336

Second degree students possessing an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university in the United States are exempt from all general education requirements at Russell Sage College. Those holding bachelor’s degrees from international institutions may appeal to the Academic Dean for a waiver of all or a portion of general education requirements.


General Education at Sage College of Albany

The Literacies of Connection is Sage College of Albany’s general education program. In a world that is increasingly complex and interconnected, the faculty of Sage College of Albany recognizes that our graduates need to understand both the diversity of fields of knowledge and also the ways in which those fields are interconnected and interdependent.

Successful completion of general education outcomes will be assessed via a Live Text portfolio. Students are required to obtain a Live Text account in their first term of study at Sage. Completion of LiveText portfolio is required.

Second bachelor degree students possessing an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university in the United States are exempt from general education requirements. Students holding bachelor’s degrees from international institutions may appeal to the Academic Dean for a waiver of all or a portion of general education requirements.

Program Outcomes/Literacies:

  • Verbal, Writing and Textual Literacy: Students will demonstrate the ability to evaluate, analyze, organize, and articulate ideas, in written and oral forms, through a variety of rhetorical modes/strategies
  • Global & Cultural Literacy: Students will demonstrate an understanding of how cultural differences (e.g., beliefs, values, traditions) impact personal and national thought and behavior.
  • Civic, Historical and Legal Literacy: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the causes and effects of historical events or governmental processes through the use of primary and secondary documents.
  • Visual Literacy: Students will demonstrate an understanding of how visual imagery shapes and informs the global circulation of ideas and information.
  • Financial Literacy: Students will find, evaluate, and apply financial information for personal or professional application and will develop a personal financial plan demonstrating their understanding of financial responsibility.
  • Values Literacy: Students will apply an ethical framework to decision making.
  • Environmental and Scientific Literacy: Students will explain how scientists use scientific data, concepts, and other evidence to draw conclusions about the natural world.
  • Quantitative Literacy: Students will accurately calculate and analyze quantitative data to arrive at appropriate mathematical conclusions to strategically solve applied mathematical problems.
  • Health and Wellness Literacy: Students will describe and give examples of policy and methods employed to solve national and global health problems
  • Technology Literacy: Students will demonstrate skills in utilizing appropriate technology for their discipline/career.

SCA Requirements : 33 credits

I. Cornerstone 
Complete all of the following:
 
  HUM 112 Language & Community* 3 credits
  ITD 155 Sage Connections** 3 credits
  ITK 101 Innovative Thinking/Learn*** 3 credits
  ITK 301 Innovative Thinking/Engage 3 credits
  Mathematics: MAT 110 or higher (ECO 215 or PSY 207 may be taken for the MAT requirement) 3 credits
   
II. Perspectives  
   
Humanities
ARH, COM, EGL, ENG, HUM, HMN, PHL, PHI, or foreign language-102 level or higher.
(Courses must be from two different prefixes/disciplines)
6 credits
   
Social Sciences
CRJ, CRM, ECO, HIS, HST, POL, PSC, PSY, PSYC, SCL or SOC 
(Courses must be from two different prefixes/disciplines)
6 credits
   
Natural Sciences
BIO, CHM, PHY or SCI 
6 credits
   
III. Culminating Experiences
Complete all of the following:
 
  Live Text portfolio  
  Experiential Learning/Internship, 3 credits (in major)
  Capstone Seminar, 3 credits (in major)
   

Notes
*HUM 112: completion of ENG 101, ENG 102 or HUM 113 may be used to fulfill this requirement
**ITD 155: waived for first time freshmen and transfer students with 21+ transfer credits upon admission
***ITK 101: waived for transfer students with 45+ transfer credits upon admission

I.Think

A unique characteristic of SCA is the I.Think program. This three-course sequence (the first two of which are general education requirements and a third which can be taken as an elective or may be required by specific programs) is designed to provide SCA students with experience in innovation thinking, creative problem-solving, group interaction, leadership, design thinking, and community engagement. Through these classes—called “Learn,” “Engage,” and “Innovate” — students will develop the skills and abilities necessary to succeed in a constantly-evolving world that increasingly demands individuals to be able to:

  • seek solutions that transcend mainstream thought and a single-discipline approach,
  • implement a problem/opportunity paradigm that serves others
  • persist in the face of obstacles,
  • value equally the roles of leader and team member and be ready to assume either as circumstances warrant,
  • honor, value and encourage diverse views, opinions and approaches,
  • negotiate with peers, subordinates and superiors,
  • master technology and employ it as a means rather than an end, and
  • use a variety of tools to communicate with a diverse population.

These abilities are in turn placed in service to a commitment to community and to improving the world around us.

Competencies

Sage College of Albany is committed to providing opportunities for academic success. The assessment of English language and mathematics is the first step toward promoting academic success. The results of the assessment program are used to help determine appropriate academic courses for each student; the goal is to help each student achieve basic proficiency in the vital English language and mathematics competencies which are necessary for collegiate success.

Assessment of English language skills and mathematics skills is based on evaluation of the high school transcript (course averages and Regents exam scores). Entering students who do not initially demonstrate competency in English language skills and mathematics skills may be identified as needing HUM 111 and/or MAT 104. Completion of HUM 111 is recommended in the first term of study. Completion of MAT 104 is recommended in the first yearof study.

All students seeking a bachelor’s degree must demonstrate mathematics competency by passing a college level mathematics course, MAT 110 or higher. Students with a documented learning disability in mathematics must meet this mathematics requirement for the bachelor’s degree.